Bread Recipes

Newest Recipes are listed below.

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Both of the following breads come from The Secrets of Jesuit Breadmaking by Brother Rick Curry, S.J. This is a great basic bread book that also follows the Catholic liturgical year. I have had the book for probably 15 years, and I don’t think I have had a bad loaf yet.

Brother’s Bread

This is a great Italian bread – crunchy crust, soft inside. I have made it with all white flour, and it is delicious. You can also substitute 2 cups of whole wheat flour for a more rustic loaf. My family’s favorite, though, is to use 2 cups of semolina flour to replace some of the white flour. (Link to the original recipe can be found here.)

  • 2 teaspoons yeast
  • 2  cups warm water
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 6 to 7 cups all purpose flour (see variations above)
  • cornmeal
  • vinegar

Combine the yeast, water and honey. Mix about half of the flour and all of the salt. Add yeast mixture. Continue to add flour until a nice dough is formed. It should be smooth and elastic and feel like a baby’s butt. Cover and let rise until doubled in bulk – about 1-2 hours. Punch dough down and divide in half. Shape into round loaves or torpedo shapes. Slash tops with a knife and spray with vinegar. Place loaves on greased baking sheet and sprinkle with cornmeal or line with parchment. Place in a cold oven and bake at 400 degrees for 45 minutes. Cool on a wire rack.

Overnight Basic Italian Bread

I like to make this bread on Saturday night to have the next day with Sunday’s red sauce. I have made it with all white flour, and it is delicious. You can also substitute 2 cups of whole wheat flour for a more rustic loaf. My family’s favorite, though, is to use 2 cups of semolina flour to replace some of the white flour. (Link to the original recipe can be found here.)

  • 2 teaspoons yeast
  • 1 1/4  cups warm water
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 4 to 5 cups all purpose flour (see variations above)
  • cornmeal
  • vinegar

Combine the yeast, water and honey. Mix about half of the flour and all of the salt. Add yeast mixture. Continue to add flour until a nice dough is formed. It should be smooth and elastic and feel like a baby’s butt. Cover and put in the refrigerator to let rise overnight. In the morning, punch dough down and divide in half. Shape into round loaves or torpedo shapes. Cover and let dough come to room temperature, about 45 minutes. Slash tops with a knife and spray with vinegar. Let dough rise another 45 minutes until doubled in bulk. Place loaves on greased baking sheet and sprinkle with cornmeal or line with parchment. Preheat oven to 400 degrees and bake for about 35-40 minutes. Cool on a wire rack.

The next bread comes from Hay Day Country Market Cookbook by Kim Rizk. I buy a lot of cookbooks at book sales, but this is one that I actually kept and use a lot. This bread makes a great sandwich loaf. It reminds me of an English toasting bread we used to buy at the gourmet food store in town. It is moist, has a nice crumb, and is great toasted with butter and jam. (Link to the original recipe can be found here.)

Everybody’s Favorite Peasant Bread

  • 1 1/2 cups warm water
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons yeast
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda (Don’t add more than this! I mistakenly did once and it was terrible!)
  • 3/4 cup cool water
  • 5 1/2 – 6 1/2 cups all purpose flour (I usually replace some of this with whole wheat. Usually around 2 cups.)
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 tablespoon butter, melted

Combine the yeast, warm water and sugar. Combine the baking soda and cool water separately. Mix about half of the flour and all of the salt. Add yeast mixture and baking soda mixture. Continue to add flour until a firm, albeit sticky, dough is formed. (The original recipe says to use the paddle attachment on a standing mixture. This always annoys me, so I use my dough hook.)  Cover and let rise until doubled in bulk. With buttered hands, divide dough in half and shape into loaves. Place loaves into greased loaf pans. Let loaves rise uncovered until they have risen about an inch above the pans. Brush tops with melted butter before placing in oven. Preheat oven to 400 degrees and bake for 30 minutes. Cool on a wire rack. Crust softens as it cools.

The next recipe comes from my father-in-law. He doesn’t have a website, but he does have an iPad! It is a great pizza dough that we make almost every Saturday night. I have also used it for stromboli.

Grandpa Buddy Petruccelli’s Pizza Dough (how can you go wrong with a name like that?)

  • 3/4 cup warm water
  • 1 tablespoon yeast
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1/4 cup white wine
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 to 4 cups all purpose flour (I have substituted up to half whole wheat.)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

Combine water, yeast and honey. Combine remaining ingredients and knead until a nice dough forms. It should be smooth and elastic and feel like a baby’s butt. Cover and let rise in an oiled bowl for about an hour. Divide in half. Dough rolls out to about 14 inches in diameter. Top and bake for about 20 minutes, until bottom of crust is crunchy and cooked through.

The next 2 recipes are classic sourdough. I have a great sourdough starter (flour and water) that was given to me by a friend – she also gave me the links to the following 2 recipes. Again, my versions are recorded below. Vincent and I tried to make our own sourdough starter several times, without success. I have also seen sourdough starters for sale, but cannot attest to any of them. My advice is to just start asking around – one will turn up and people are happy to share. (If you are local to WNC, leave a comment and we can arrange a sourdough exchange.)

The BEST English Muffins EVER

These took me a while to master, but as the young kids say “OMG”, they are good. I probably make them 3 times a week – no joke! I do frequently share them, but my boys love them for snacks straight up with butter, slathered with cream cheese and jam or made into little pizzas. Apparently they also help to mend a shattered heart, as my friend who lost his partner in December has eaten one every day for breakfast since then. That is a lot of cred for a little muffin. (Link to the original recipe can be found here.)

The night before set your starter:

  • 1 cup sourdough starter
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 cups whole wheat or spelt flour (I usually grind about 1 cup of wheatberries and add 1/2 cup white flour.)

Stir. Cover and let sit overnight.

The next morning add:

  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 to 1 1/2 cups all purpose flour

Mix by hand until a stiff, but sticky, dough is formed. Cover and let rise for 45 minutes. Heat a big skillet with about 1 tablespoon oil (I use coconut) on medium heat. Drop the dough by big spoonfuls into hot pan. Let cook on first side for about 3-4 minutes or until the underside is nice and brown. Flip, lower heat to low and cover pan. Cook on the second side for about 8 minutes. I usually shake the pan about halfway through cooking. The second side never gets as brown as first side, for some reason. Makes 10 muffins.

Classic Sourdough Bread 

I always make this bread in a standard loaf pan, although I am sure it would be good as a free form loaf or a baguette. (The link to the original recipe can be found here.)

The night before set your starter:

  • 1 cup sourdough starter
  • 2 cups water
  • 4 cups white flour (You can also split this: half whole grain, half white. I usually grind about 2 cups of wheatberries and add 2 cups white flour.)

Stir. Cover and let sit overnight.

The next morning add:

  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 to 3 cups all purpose flour

Knead until a nice dough forms. It should be smooth and elastic and feel like a baby’s butt. Cover and let rise until doubled in bulk – about 1-2 hours. Punch dough down and divide in half. Put into greased loaf pans, cover and let rise until bread crests the tops of the pans. Preheat oven to 400 degrees and bake for 40 minutes. Cool on a wire rack.

The next recipe is the first bread recipe I ever baked when I started baking bread almost 25 years ago. It all started when I was in college with this sourdough starter from my great aunt. I still bake these rolls today, and everybody still goes crazy for them. They are my stock in trade with my farmer neighbors. That’s what they like best: soft rolls, made with nothing but white flour. I do make them for my family too. I like to have them in the freezer to use as hamburger rolls. (The link to the original starter recipe and bread recipe can be found here.) Note: Although this is a sourdough recipe, I do use yeast. That was how my mom did it and how my great aunt did too. I know people who just use the starter to leaven the bread.

Southern Sourdough Rolls

The day before, take your jar of starter out of the refrigerator and let it come to room temperature on the counter. Feed your starter with 1 cup water, 1/2 cup sugar, 3 tablespoons of instant potato flakes. It will become very active and bubbly over the next several hours.

  • 1 1/2 cups warm water
  • 2 teaspoons yeast
  • 1 cup starter
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 5-6 cups bread flour

Combine yeast and warm water until frothy. Mix the remaining ingredients and add the yeast mixture to the bowl. Knead until dough comes together. It will form a sticky dough rather quickly, and this is enough kneading. Let rise until doubled in bulk. Punch dough down and divide into 3 large lumps. Divide each lump into 6 pieces. Shape rolls and place into 3 greased pie plates. Cover and let rise again. Rolls will rise until they form a single mass, with the individual rolls still evident. Bake at 350 for 30 minutes. Cool on wire rack.

This comes from the book Baking Bread with Children by Warren Lee Cohen.

Bagels

  • 4.5 cups of bread flour (I use a combination of white, whole wheat and 1/2 cup of rye)
  • 1 T honey or sugar
  • 2 t salt
  • 2 t yeast
  • 1.5 cups warm water
  • 1 egg white
  • sesame or poppy seeds to sprinkle on top

Proof yeast with honey. Add flour and salt – knead for 10 minutes. Let rise until doubled. (I make this at night, let the dough start to rise and then stick it in the fridge to rise overnight for hot bagels in the morning.) Divide dough into 12 pieces and shape into small balls. Poke your thumb through the center of the ball, stretch the dough and create rings. Let rise for about 20 minutes. While bagels are rising, boil about 2 quarts of water with 2 T of sugar. Boil bagels for about 30 seconds per side. Place them on baking sheet with cornmeal to prevent from sticking. (I bake them on a baking stone.) Brush with egg white and sprinkle with seeds. Bake at 400 for 20 minutes.

Oh so good.

This recipe comes from The Waldorf Kindergarten Snack Book, collected and annotated by Lisa Hildreth.

Rose Room Rolls

  • 2 tablespoons yeast
  • 3 cups warm water
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 3 tablespoons oil
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 8 cups of flour (mix of whole wheat and white)

Stir together yeast, water and honey. Wait for it to get foamy. Add the oil, salt and flour and stir until it forms a dough. Knead the dough for 5 minutes. Let rise for 30 minutes. Form into rolls. Let rest for 15 minutes. Bake at 325 for 20 minutes or until golden brown.

7 thoughts on “Bread Recipes

  1. Pingback: Baking Bread | Sure as the World

  2. Pingback: Planning: Food | Sure as the World

    • LOL

      That was my first ever bread book. I bought it before the boys were born.

      We had Brother’s Bread with dinner tonite.

      I just answered your email.
      xo

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