Brass Tacks: My homeschooling day

*This is our rhythm for last year, when I was only teaching one main lesson. If you want to see what we are planning for this year, teaching two main lessons, see this post.

Another thing I couldn’t find when I started homeschooling were actual examples of what a homeschooling day looked like. Below you can see what our day typically looks like. In my next post, I plan to explore how our rhythm influences how we spend our time. I am also planning to post more details on chores, circle, main lessons, etc in other future posts.

Times are only approximate.

5:30-6:00am I get up, have my coffee, record what we did yesterday and think about what happens today.

7:00am First child up.

7:30 Second child up.

8:00am Dad leaves for work. Boys make their first breakfast (usually cereal) by themselves.

(At this point, the house is still pretty quiet and I am still doing my own thing.)

9:00am I am dressed, have eaten my own breakfast, am having my second cup of coffee and ready to start the day with the boys.

9am-10am Boys eat a “real” breakfast (not cereal) that either they make, I make or some combination. They get dressed and brush their teeth. Bread is rising.

10am Everyone does morning chores.

11:00 We head out for our morning walk. This gets out their ya-yas and insures the dog doesn’t interrupt our lesson. We do this everyday in any weather.

11:30 We come into the school room and start circle. After circle, we say our opening verse and then my 6 year old kindy boy is free to leave. I begin the main lesson for my 4th grader.

12:30 Finish main lesson with my 4th grader. His main lesson usually lasts between 45-60 minutes. He also does a separate 15 minute daily math practice (unless we are doing a math block).

12:30-3:00pm Eat lunch. Boys play. I go on my walk.

3:00pm I make a cup of tea, set out a snack tray and call the boys to reading. I read aloud to them for about 45-60 minutes everyday. After this, the school day is done.

4-6:00pm Boys play. The house gets straightened up. Dinner gets prepared. Dad comes home.

6:30 Eat dinner.

7-8:30 This is when the boys are with dad – either playing, getting ready for bed, bathing, reading or some combination of all of the above.

8:00-8:30 Both boys asleep.

9:30pm I’m asleep, so I can wake up and do it all again tomorrow.

PS If you are reading this via The Parenting Passageway, please read this post as well. It balances what I say here, and gives a more realistic view of rhythm and reality.

5 thoughts on “Brass Tacks: My homeschooling day

  1. Pingback: Rhythm: Part Four | The Parenting Passageway

  2. Wow! I came over from Parenting Passageway, and am envious of your calm, spacious sounding day. I can imagine it feels soothing and serene. I am reframing my day with my 8 and 5 year olds at the moment – we are by no means Waldorf purists, and our day is much more full and my 5 year old has begged for academic work since she was 3 so she is now learning to read and write, but I really would like to draw upon the feeling that reading about your day has given me to help smooth out our own day which can feel too staccato and splintered very often. Thanks so much for sharing – and also thanks for the bread recipes!

    • Hey Lucy,
      Did you see my post “Lying While Blogging“? My days are not always as calm as they seem to be in that one post Carrie mentioned, although that is my goal. I came to Waldorf when my boys were 8 and 5. It was really hard in the beginning to impose a rhythm, but worth it, worth it, worth it. Good luck and stay in touch.

  3. In trying to inductively figure some of your Waldorf terminology, like “main lesson”, I came upon this article. I thought it was interesting and thought you might too. I think it made me think of you, in part, because of your comment in a post about changing your routine, circle time, etc. because you were all in a funk with the way it had been. Anyhow, you might like this: http://www.waldorftoday.com/2011/01/rethinking-the-threefold-division-of-the-main-lesson-christof-weichert/

  4. Pingback: Planning: Rhythm | Sure as the World

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